Conservation Trails

If you would like a short hike within easy reach of the inn these Chatham trails will appeal to you.

Harding's Beach Trail
Begin walking from the second parking lot located at Chatham's Harding's Beach and walk east along a sand road toward the lighthouse. Numbered markers indicate points of interest and are keyed to The Harding's Beach trail guide. The trail guide is available at the Chatham Chamber of Commerce Information Booth, the foundation's Mayo

House or from the attendant at the booth at the entrance to the Harding's Beach parking area. Please return the trail guide after your walk. The walk is about 45 minutes long and covers approximately 7.64 acres.

Frost Fish Creek Trail
Beginning at the main entrance of the inn, turn left and drive north on Route 28 towards Orleans for 1.7 miles. Just beyond Rowland Drive on your right, turn left into the parking area before you reach a creek running under the road. The trail proceeds along the creek and marsh. At the end of the trail you turn left and proceed to the parking area via the ridge path. Be advised that the ridge is somewhat difficult to walk. The walk is about 30 minutes long and covers approximately 1.2 acres.

George Ryder Road, South Trail
Located off Route 28 and George Ryder Road, proceed south on George Ryder Road to the first right onto Harold's Lane. Take the first right off Harold Lane onto an unmarked short paved road, which will turn into a dirt road. Park at the end of the pavement. Walk 45 steps along the dirt road. The entrance to the walk is on your left, opposite Beehive and Cranberry Bog. The walk is about 10 minutes long and covers approximately 2.5 acres.

Honeysuckle Lane, Off Stage Harbor Road
At the bottom of the hill on the left side of the road are two short trails leading to the old ice pond. Many water birds are generally seen in this area. On the right side of the road near a telephone pole and along side of a narrow stream is a short walk featuring white cedar trees. It also leads to other trails in and around the cedar swamp, which is primarily owned by the Town of Chatham.